Home » Archive

Articles in the Policy Category

Detention, Enforcement, Policy »

[21 Mar 2010 | No Comment | ]
Costs for detention up, ICE head says

John Morton made his case to the Appropriations Committee last week requesting $2.6 billion for FY2011, an additional $20 million above last year for the Detention and Removal Operations.
ICE is proposing an overall FY 2011 budget of $5.8 billion, an increase of 2 percent over the FY 2010 budget.
Questioned why not not all 33,400 beds were being utilized, Morton said they could not afford the 33,400 beds, because the funding budgeted for the 33,400 were based on $99 a day vs. the $122 a day that ICE now has …

Detention, Enforcement, Policy »

[12 Nov 2009 | No Comment | ]

We wrote last week that CCA will likely bid on a new detention center in Los Angeles.  Andrew Becker at the Center for Investigative Reporting blogs today that ICE will soon begin collecting proposals:
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, an agency of the Department of Homeland Security, posted an online notice this week stating that it intends to open bids on Dec. 15 for a contractor to own and operate a low-custody detention facility for men.
The facility would be one of the largest immigration lock-ups in the country. Continuing a policy pushed …

Detention, Enforcement, Policy »

[5 Nov 2009 | No Comment | ]

In earnings reports released this week the nation’s two largest private prison operators cited “significant growth opportunities” for detaining immigrants, driven largely by the Obama administration’s emphasis on detaining “criminal aliens.”
The GEO Group – an international private prison operator that draws about 75 percent of its revenue from controlling a quarter of the U.S. private prison industry – said it believes that “this federal initiative to target, detain, and deport “criminal aliens” throughout the country will continue to drive the need for immigration detention beds over the next several years.”
A …

Detention, Enforcement, Policy »

[24 Oct 2009 | One Comment | ]

The Center for Investigative Reporting report that:
A second high-ranking official in a two-month-old federal office that oversees immigration detention policy and planning has left the government, sources say.
Cree Zischke, tasked with addressing detainee health care issues for Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Office of Detention Policy and Planning, departed just weeks after her boss, Dr. Dora Schriro, left ICE in late September to become commissioner of New York City’s jails.
“I am no longer with the ICE Office of Detention Planning and Policy (sic),” she wrote in an out-of-office auto-reply received on …

Detention, Enforcement, Policy »

[7 Oct 2009 | 2 Comments | ]

On the same day that Corrections Corporation of America opened a new 500-bed immigrant detention center in Georgia, Homeland Security officials released a highly anticipated review of detention centers. Accompanied by recommendations and next steps, the review promises better federal oversight and health care in the largely outsourced network of prisons and jails that house a daily average of 32,000 people with pending immigration and refugee status requests.
“The government has recognized that it has a massive system with serious problems, and has identified steps to ameliorate the situation,” …

Detention, Policy »

[27 Jun 2009 | No Comment | ]
TN court to determine if CCA will release records

The Tennessean reported June 26 that the Tennessee state appeals court will determine if Corrections Corporation of America, the largest U.S. private detention operator, is an equivalent to a government entity, and therefore should release public records to the same extent.
CCA says that “the release of such records will set a bad precedent with other private companies who contract with the state,” reported the newspaper. Currently, private prison operators do not have to release public records.
Alex Friedmann, Prison Legal News Associate Editor and vice president of advocacy group Private Corrections …

Detention, Enforcement, Policy, Uncategorized »

[18 May 2009 | No Comment | ]

Terra Magazine columnist and New York-based writer, Pablo Calvi, spoke with the authors of this website about their reporting on privatized immigrant detention under the Bush administration, and what type of detention policies they anticipate from the Obama administration.
This is the first time BusinessofDetention.com has been profiled in a Spanish language publication.
You can read the story, with excerpts from the complete interview here.

Detention, Enforcement, Policy »

[13 May 2009 | 2 Comments | ]
Napolitano speaks to Appropriations Committee on DHS priorities

The Secure Communities program, targeting criminal aliens and E-Verify are just three of the Department of Homeland Security’s priorities, DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano spoke about in a hearing in front of the House Appropriations Committee on Homeland Security Tuesday.
One key thing to note is that when asked about alternatives to detention, Napolitano expressed that alternatives were as expensive as detention, which could suggest that the current demand for detention beds will continue.
From Napolitano’s written testimony:
E-Verify: Total funding of $112 million and 80 new positions are requested to support improvements to …

Detention, Enforcement, Policy, Uncategorized »

[8 May 2009 | One Comment | ]

The nation’s largest private prison provider has more empty beds than this time last year – occupancy rates at Corrections Corporation of America facilities now average 89.4 percent, compared to 97 percent in 2008.
But CCA is not seeing a downturn in demand. It added 9,300 new beds into service between 2008 and 2009, and saw an increase of 4.2 percent in population, company officials said Thursday in a conference call with investors to discuss their 2009 First Quarter earnings.
Many of these new beds will be filled with immigrants detained along …

Detention, Policy, Prosecution, Uncategorized »

[3 Apr 2009 | 2 Comments | ]

No drinking water, changes of clothing, soap or shower – those are the conditions inside a Los Angeles jail for immigrants that prompted the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California to sue the federal government. Detainees also lack access to mail and attorneys.
The facility is designed to detain immigrants for 12 hours or less, but the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency uses it to house immigrants for several weeks. The jail, known as B-18, is located in a basement.
“The facility fails on every level to house detainees in a …